MMS 2016 – Another Great Success!

Wow three intense days (plus a pre-con day). It was really great to see old friends, make new friends, present AND learn. I’m very proud to be one of the volunteer staff for MMS-we have a great team, and a lot of passion.

We just sent out our MMS evaluation on Friday, and already the feedback is (once again) fantastic. A huge percentage of attendees agree that this is the best conference you can attend for System Center and EMS. Tons of deep dives, Q&A and BoF sessions, and community – I’ll tell you, community is my favorite part. We learn so much from each other when we share our knowledge, war stories, and even just a cold beverage.

If you weren’t able to attend, take a look at our schedule (and the twitter stream) to see what you missed. And while you’re wishing you had been there, mark your calendars for MMS 2017, which will be the week of May 15th 2017. And keep an eye on http://mmsmoa.com/ for updates for early bird registration (hint, start stashing just a little over $100 a month now, and you’ll be able to cover early bird registration when it opens).

Oh, and if this picture doesn’t make any sense to you, that’s even more reason to attend next year.

We’ll be sure and post our eval results again this year, once we close evals. Stay tuned!

 

Greg

 

 

Tidy Cache – Clean Up Old CCMCache

You are probably already aware that ConfigMgr manages its client cache pretty well. I’ve run into situations where server VMs are running leaner and leaner, with much less disk space on the system drive than desired, so I built a compliance settings rule that will help keep the cache a little more tidy than we do out-of-the-box.

This script is an example to purge all content in the ccmcache folder that is older than 60 days.  Below is a simple example for creating a compliance settings rule.

Create a new Configuration Item CI, and paste the contents of the Discovery script and Remediation script into their respective locations. Create a new compliance rule, for where the count from your discovery script equals zero, as shown below.

Discovery Script:

#discover
$MinDays = 60
$UIResourceMgr = New-Object -ComObject UIResource.UIResourceMgr
$Cache = $UIResourceMgr.GetCacheInfo()
($Cache.GetCacheElements() |
where-object {[datetime]$_.LastReferenceTime -lt (get-date).adddays(-$mindays)} |
Measure-object).Count

Remediation Script:

#remediate
$MinDays = 60
$UIResourceMgr = New-Object -ComObject UIResource.UIResourceMgr
$Cache = $UIResourceMgr.GetCacheInfo()
$Cache.GetCacheElements() |
where-object {[datetime]$_.LastReferenceTime -lt (get-date).adddays(-$mindays)} |
foreach {
$Cache.DeleteCacheElement($_.CacheElementID)
}

tidycache

Deploy this script (with remediation) to your test lab group, and verify that it properly purges content that is older than 60 days in the ccmcache folder.

All Set! Test, test, and release to prod!

Greg